A few of our clients
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John Lewis
Grand national
DPD
Woolworths
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“I do very much believe that this is what our founder Spedan Lewis would be doing if he was around today.”

Paul Coby, IT Director, John Lewis

Want to reduce click and collect service times by 50%?

You can. Meet Click and Collect from Localz. Designed to revolutionise the buy-online-pick-up-in-store (BOPIS) process.


  • Hardware costs reduced by 35%
  • Employee efficiency is improved by 30%
  • Delivery of customer orders are 50% faster
  • Employees and customers are 100% happier

Tell me more

 

Want to build scalable location capabilities into apps fast?

You can. Meet Spotz, the micro-location platform from Localz. Simplify the integration of beacons and micro-location into your apps.


  • Create your experience in the Spotz platform
  • Integrate Spotz with your existing platforms
  • Add the Spotz SDK to your app
  • Scale the experience to meet your needs
  • Launch your location-enabled app!

Try Spotz for free

“Localz solution is at the forefront of micro-location and beacon technology. Seeing their success with customers… gives us great confidence in working with them as a partner.”

Michael Stevens-Jones, Partner Executive, IBM

 

Winners of the following competitions
John Lewis JLAB
Dagrofa Ideas.001
IBM SmartCamp
Start Tank
Retail Recharged

Latest from our blog

Blurring the lines between online and offline

May 23, 2016
One thing that is clear about the modern shoppers is that they don’t shop online or offline – they just shop. If a customer is browsing online, and provided a great personalised online experience, they expect that to translate into their in-store experience. The challenge for brands and retailers is to provide one seamless experience, from online to the physical store. For example, when customers start their journey online with Click and Collect, by placing an order online, often retailers have done a good job of making this online experience smooth and frictionless. But when a customer arrives in store – they don’t know where to go to collect their parcel, and when they do, they may have to queue for a long time, giving the customer a poor experience that they do not wish to repeat. So how can we bridge this gap between the digital and the physical experience? Well, the great thing, is that 66% of UK adults [1] are walking around with a smartphone in their pocket, and some even with a smart watch on their wrist. We are all constantly connected online, as we walk around the physical world. Not only that, according to a recent study Localz conducted, across over 1M smartphone users, including both our own user base, and surveying others – 80% of smartphone users have location services switched on. So what does that mean? It means that you can communicate with 80% of your app users, in real-time, as they walk into your store. Location technology can let you know, in real-time where a customer is in the physical world.  Not only that – you can communicate with them in real-time. Think of all the possibilities that opens up. People often think of beacons when they think of location technology, but actually a geo-fence, which is an area defined by GPS coordinates, can sometimes be just as effective. A geo-fence does not need hardware and takes minutes to setup. Using this technology is an easy way to connect your customers’ online experience with their in-store experience.  So what is the best way to use this great technology? If you think customers get annoyed if they feel like they are being spammed via email, imagine how they will react if they feel like you are spamming them on their mobile phone. Flooding customers with annoying irrelevant offers is not the answer. If a customer has had a great personalised experience online, this needs to translate into their in-store experience. The best use of location technology is when it is used to remove friction from an experience, by providing better customer service. For instance, Woolworths Australia is using geo-fences across over 200 stores, to improve the retailer’s Click and Collect experience. The initial results from using location technology include dropping average collection times from 15 mins to 7 mins, with the fastest collection being just under a minute – and this continues to improve. To read the full use case, click here. The great thing

5 Ways Location Technology Can Improve Banking Service

May 20, 2016
The banking industry is one of the many industries affected by digital disruption. Banks are looking to meet customer demands with innovative technologies and offer them convenience and efficiency. With technology changing the way customers interact with their world, banking customers are also seeking better, more convenient and faster service. According to a report by Fujitsu UK&I [1], 72% of UK customers use online banking on a weekly basis. Furthermore, in a Juniper Research [2] report, it is stated that 71% of UK customers use mobile banking. Both numbers show how important it is for banks to have an online presence and more specifically, a mobile one. However, it is not enough to only create a mobile app or a mobile-friendly website to keep up with customers’ demands. Banks need to go the extra mile and deliver an exceptional, personalised experience to their customers. With 39% of UK customers considering leaving their provider if digital demands are not met, banks need to consider new technologies to improve their service. Location technology is one of these technologies. Here are five ways in which location technology can improve payment and banking experiences. VIP Greeting and Service Banks can use beacon technology to integrate the physical branch of a bank with a mobile device in the hands of a customer. When customers enter a branch, the staff can be alerted and can greet customers in person, by name. Staff can be updated with a customer’s personal details on a dashboard or mobile device, allowing them to provide a personalised service based on the customer profile. Dynamic Scheduling Dynamic scheduling would allow for staff to provide flexible scheduling options to customers, by enabling them to book and updated appointments in real-time. For example, when a customer is close to a bank branch, they could check to see whether that particular branch has an available advisor at that moment. This would enable them to book an appointment straight away, or the bank could provide the customer an alternative time or branch, saving time and avoiding queues. Frictionless Checkout Location technology can be used to streamline the payment process, whether payment is online from home, in branches or through third party websites (such as paying for an Amazon order). There is nothing more frustrating for customers than being asked to enter personal details multiple times for the same payment transaction. For example, when customers order online through a retailer and are prompt to enter passwords and are redirected to the bank website for security checks. To eliminate this long process of identifying whether the person who is doing the transaction is the owner of that bank account/credit card, banks can use location technology. By knowing the person’s location, banks could monitor where the mobile device of that person is in real-time and compare it to the address on the system. If the person’s device is at the home or work address, the payment process could be shortened, as it confirms the right person is making the payment. People

Localz Co-Hosted Killer Retail Experience: Part Two

May 19, 2016
What makes a killer retail experience? Retailers need to think about delivering a unique experience, which is relevant to the customer and to their brand. In order to do so, retailers should constantly innovate and use the latest technology to build an omni-channel customer journey that fulfills customers’ needs. After the huge success of the Killer Retail Experience in March 2016, the hosts Teradata, Peerius, yReceipts and Localz decided to organise the event again, but make it bigger and better. With inspiring talks, innovative demos and a panel discussion, the latest Killer Retail Experience gathered representatives from top brands like Unilever, Marks & Spencer, JD Williams, Topman, New Look, Russell & Bromley and many more. To kick off the event, Holly Mander, Director of Digital Strategy at Teradata, talked about how brands can keep up with shoppers being digitally connected all the time. Alexander Kayser, CEO and Co-Founder of yReceipts, spoke about unlocking the £37 billion brick and mortar opportunity by linking the online and offline channels. Nimmity Zappert, Head of Sales and Partnerships at Localz, continued the discussion about how retailers can build that bridge using location technology. Nimmity highlighted that 80% of smartphone users have location services enabled, which means that location technology gives retailers the ability to connect with customers as they walk into their store, in real-time. Joey Moore, Product Director at Peerius, explained the benefits of providing personalised experience to customers. Customers who receive personalised marketing increase their spent by 13%. The last presentation was by Andrew Howe, Sales Director at Teradata, speaking about how programmatic advertising enables retailers to future proof their marketing and to fully understand their customers. After all the amazing talks and insights into how to create a great customer experience, attendees were divided into groups to see the Killer Experience demo, combining all the solutions of the four hosts. You can see a video of the experience here. A panel discussion was moderated by Katy Bennett from Teradata and included Victoria Peppiatt, COO at Phrasee; Richard Wilson, Director of Digital at Burton Arcadia; Sophie Albizua, Consultant and Co-Founder of eNova Partnership and Holly Mander from Teradata. The panel discussed the key areas for retailers to focus on, to move closer to a true omni-channel experience. Ideas included: Linking and understanding customer behavior online and in-store is key. 80% of customers browse online before making a purchase in store. Connecting with customers across all channels is essential for retailers’ success. Getting in store and meeting customers face to face, is key to understanding what they want, and to developing a successful digital strategy. 49% of digital jobs have been held for less than a year. Organisations need to be forward thinking and innovative to attract and retain the right talent for digital success. Train from within, to make digital innovation a part of the culture, and accessible to all. Here is a video with the highlights from Killer Retail Experience 2: Retailers learnt that a killer experience puts customers needs at

Localz Last Mile Delivery with DPD UK

May 16, 2016
Localz Last Mile helps DPD UK to improve their last mile delivery service by reducing costs and increasing first time delivery rates. DPD has launched Your DPD, a new mobile app which allows customers to track their deliveries and update their delivery preferences while the parcel is in-flight. The challenge DPD set for Localz was to improve first time delivery rates which would improve the customer experience and reduce DPDs operating costs. Localz Last Mile provides the latest in location technology to enable DPD and their delivery drivers to check whether a customer is at the provided delivery address in real-time before reaching the destination. If a customer is away from home, they can be provided with options to reschedule their delivery or authorise to have it left in a safe place or with a neighbour in real-time. DPD are a leading parcel delivery company in the UK. The company prides itself as a delivery expert that can satisfy all distribution needs. DPD UK works with top retail clients like ASOS, Amazon and John Lewis to provide a delivery experience that matches and exceeds their customers expectations. The YourDPD app lets customers receive push notifications when the driver is 30 minutes away from the delivery address. If the customer is not at home and wants to reschedule the delivery they will receive a push notification, via the Localz Last Mile platform, asking them if they would like to update their delivery preference. For example: “Hi Ben, our driver is on his way to your address and we noticed that you’re not home. Would you like to change your preference to allow someone else to sign/leave parcel in a safe place/leave it with a neighbour or deliver to another address?” The response is then sent to the driver in real time. An additional feature is that, with the customers’ permission, the YourDPD app can automatically detect when the customer has returned to the delivery address, prompting a message to the customer and the driver to return with the delivery later in their run. Here is a short video to demonstrate some of the benefits of Your DPD:   About the project, Tim Andrew, Co-Founder and Commercial Director at Localz says: “ DPD’s clever use of location technology to improve the efficiency of their last mile delivery service and customer experience is going to reinforce their position as the UK’s most innovative logistics company.” Localz Last Mile saves time and money by helping to reduce delivery and SMS costs. It has the additional environmental and cost benefit of materially reducing the number of wasted miles driven. Improved first-time delivery significantly improves customer satisfaction with both DPD and the clients they are delivering on behalf of.

Guest blog from RedEye: 4 Key Steps to Guide your Customer Through an Omni-Channel Journey

May 13, 2016
App…email…in-store…wait, where is my customer going now? Tracking down where your customer is and working out how to keep them engaged with your brand is a challenge faced by all multi-channel retailers, but it is precisely this challenge that also presents a huge opportunity. Let’s look firstly at our online channels- these include website, apps, emails, social channels. With the real-time flexibility that digital channels allow, you can provide a wealth of information, give clear product and service visibility and allow customers to purchase wherever they may be. Then we have our primary offline channel, our bricks and mortar stores – these allow customers direct interaction with products, staff and enable a physical immersion of the brand. Customers may already successfully engage with your brand through one or many of these touch points but the journey customers take across both online and offline channels will be their overarching – and total – experience of that brand. It is at this level where they will accumulate the memories, perceptions and ultimately their loyalty. So how exactly do you keep up with customer’s expectations, gain their trust across all channels and stay ahead of competition all at the same time? I believe the key to success is to ensure that customers who start out online, browsing your website or checking out your app are reinforced with a memorable experience when entering your store. This also works in reverse, your online channels should make your customer feel as valued as they would in your store. Here are my four key steps in which you can ensure you are guiding your customer through an engaging omni-channel customer journey: DO YOUR RESEARCH The first and most important step is to commit to truly understanding your customers’ journey and end-to-end experience with tailored user research, both online and in-store. Direct user experience research will help to unlock the precise insights which tell you exactly when and where you should – or should not – be engaging with your customer and delivering content. Examples of research methods include: In-store observation to identify points of opportunity Survey and interview feedback to gather insights Web and store analysis A GENUINE SINGLE CUSTOMER VIEW So now you have done your research it’s time to evaluate if you have a Single Customer View. The Single Customer View is what enables the delivery of a genuinely memorable and joined up journey for anyone who engages with a brand across online and offline platforms. It has been found that high performing marketers are 10x more likely to be actively mapping their customer journeys and 14x more likely to have integrated systems for a Single Customer View, compared to under-performers. These high performers were also found to be 34x more likely to be excellent at creating personalised omni-channel customer experiences. [2016 State of Marketing Report, Salesforce] Consider just some of the possible data that you could be collecting online that could influence your offline strategy: Categories browsed Products viewed Saved preferences and personal information

Product Update: Beacon Toolkit

May 5, 2016
Localz has updated the Beacon Toolkit with some cool new features and UI enhancements. In the past few weeks, we started to share with you what our developers have been up to. Before we get into that, let’s remind you what the Localz’ Beacon Toolkit is and what is does. Beacon Toolkit is a simple app that allows your compatible iOS device to become a Bluetooth Low Energy (iBeacon compatible) beacon. With this app you can generate beacons from QR codes, URLs, JSON files or manually create beacons yourself. It also makes it much simpler to use any existing compatible iOS hardware as a beacon trigger and removes the need to purchase and manage additional beacons. So, what’s new with Localz Beacon Toolkit app? With our next update, you’ll be able to login to your Spotz platform account to synchronise the beacons you’ve setup. This is particularly useful during testing and implementation as any changes you make in the platform are synced with the app. Included in the updated version is the ability to login to either the Australian (AU) or European (EU) Spotz environments to ensure everyone who uses the Spotz platform can access their user account and beacons in the Beacon Toolkit. There are some new UI enhancements. The developers team has also been working hard at squashing any remaining bugs. What haven’t we changed? The Beacon Toolkit retains the ability to set up and store beacons on the local device without a Spotz account. We have kept the in-built folder structure, because it makes it much easier to find your way through the app. We would love to hear what your thoughts are on the updated Localz Beacon Toolkit. Download the new app here and give your feedback.  

Top 6 Best Practices to Maximise take up of Location Services

May 3, 2016
At first glance, the results of our survey and research make sober reading. Especially for beacon manufacturers. The funnel carves out about 85% of your app users, leaving just over 15% of your app users that you can potentially engage with via BLE. When BLE is not considered, and geofences are used instead, the numbers look much better – just over half of your app users can be engaged via location services, which is more encouraging. But on reflection, when we consider the survey results, respondents indicated that 80% were prepared to switch location services on – provided there is a benefit and their privacy concerns have been addressed. So what can be done about this to improve the uptake and will this work?  Well, in two recent apps that we location enabled for our customers, a lot of focus was put into getting a large uptake of location services – and particular BLE. This was done by implementing the following: Providing a well-designed coaching screen that emphasises the benefits of turning location services and BLE on during app install. Clearly stating what location information is used and when– just before the location permission pop up is triggered by the OS. Providing an app banner at the top of the app when it is in the foreground and location services or BLE are off. For example, Sending a push message to customers in a geofence to remind them to switch BLE on when they go into the venue (need to be careful with this, as this can easily perceived as spam) Marketing and communications near the locations that highlight the benefits of the app, with a focus on saving time or money. This is ideally a combination of physical, online and mobile branding, with enthusiastic staff encouraging the use of the app Last but not least, demonstrating value to customers. This is not serving them an ad for a cross-sell, but more about saving them money and time. This is not an exhaustive list and we are sure there are more ways to achieve this.  However, when we specifically look at an app where steps 1 to 6 were well executed, the results look like much more promising: This shows that some simple tricks can cause a substantial uplift of users that are prepared to use location services and Bluetooth. When compared to the overall average, the number of users that have authorised the app for location services increases from 51.7% to 83.5%. The bigger increase seems to come from users switching their BLE on – from 27.8 to 74%. The likely reason for this is that it is relatively easy to switch on BLE on devices (slide up/down and tap). Overall, it looks like that the effect of the funnel can be beaten, but 100% coverage – or even in the 90s will be unlikely at this stage. There just needs to be a clear benefit for customers and not too much creepiness about what information is collected and

Top 10 Tips for successful Click and Collect service

April 29, 2016
In recent years, click and collect has become very popular to the extent that it is now a vital offering for any large multi-channel retailer. With home deliveries not offering convenient delivery times or affordable prices for a same day or next day deliveries, customers nowadays prefer to order online and collect it in-store later. In 2015, 73% of the UK online shoppers used click and collect [1] and one in five said the service changed the way they shopped [2]. This is evidence of how significant it is for retailers to offer the service and to get it right. So what does a retailer have to consider to ensure the delivery of a great click and collect customer experience? Here are top ten tips on how to succeed: Promote the service It might be obvious, but if you want customers to use click and collect, promote it. If the service is not properly displayed on your website, how are customers supposed to benefit from it? Make it visible on your home page, product pages, basket pages and throughout the whole checkout process. The same applies to your mobile site and app. Take for example John Lewis, who state clearly that they provide click and collect as a service: Advertise click and collect in-store, too. Ensure it works across all devices In times when customers use multiple devices to place orders, retailers need to make sure that they have a stable, consistent presence both online and offline. Barclays [3] predicts UK customers will spend £53.6bn a year using their smartphones and tablets by 2024. This means that retailers have to ensure they have a well-designed, responsive and easy to use desktop site, mobile site and mobile app with a smooth running click and collect service. Allow users to check local stock availability Providing customers with information about stock levels is essential. Customers want to know if you have the items they want to buy in their preferred store. It saves the frustration of going all the way to that store and finding out that the item they viewed online is not available. Additionally, if the stock level of a specific order is low and customers can see that, it can push them towards a purchase. You can also suggest alternative products for the items that are out of stock. There is a chance the customer is buying a gift for somebody else and does not mind buying a similar item instead. Be clear about timings Customers do not want to waste time and wait around in a store. That is one of the main reasons why they prefer click and collect over home delivery. Tell them if the order will be ready later that day or tomorrow after 5 p.m. They have to know when they have to be there to pick it up. Don’t charge for the service Customers always want to pay as little as possible. They will not spend extra money if they can get the same product from your

Localz Attended Business Rocks 2016

April 27, 2016
Last week, Localz travelled to Manchester to attend one of the most exciting events this year Business Rocks 2016. With keynote speakers like Steve Wozniak, Co-Founder of Apple, and Jeff Hoffman, Founder of Priceline.com, the technology and investment summit definitely was the place to be this April. The second we arrived at the venue, Manchester Central Convention Complex, we could feel the excitement and the anticipation of everyone, waiting for the doors to open and Business Rocks to start. KPMG and Tesla Motors UK were the first two big stands that you could not miss. The middle of the venue was occupied by more exhibitors’ stands and in each corner of the hall there was a stage, each serving a different purpose and audience. The Headline Stage hosted world-class keynotes and panel debates from some of the biggest names in the tech world, including Steve Wozniak, Co-Founder of Apple. In the Developer Dome, there were demos and sessions on topics, covering iOS, Android, Enterprise Apps, Fintech, Connected Car, e-commerce, IoT, Payments, Gaming, Wearables, UX & UI design and App monitisation. The Investor Stage included keynote talks, panel sessions, and surgeries about tech investment, investor speed dating and meeting areas. And finally, the Innov8 Battle Stage was where 100 global tech start-ups were competing against each other by pitching in front of 20 world-class tech judges. Even though all the talks were very interesting, two of them were enjoyed by the Localz’ team enormously. Obviously, the first one was the highlight of Business Rocks 2016 – the interview with Steve Wozniak, Co-Founder of Apple. He spoke about the company and his present position in it as well as how, together with Steve Jobs, they created Apple II. During his on-stage interview with Sunday Times journalist Bryan Appleyard, the “Woz” shared his opinion about artificial intelligence and why he believes humans will become ‘the family dogs’ of the robots in the future. No surprise the Headline Stage was overcrowded for that one hour. Another inspiring talk was the one, given by Jeff Hoffman, the Founder of Priceline.com. He spoke about the ideas and businesses he came up with in the past. He also shared some stories from his childhood and linked them to the idea that people easily give up on their dreams and goals, which should not be the case. Jeff explained how dreams are driving people to success and how we need to spend every day trying to get closer to accomplishing our dreams – whether that’s money, travelling around the world or an expensive Ferrari. Apart from the very exciting and educational talks, this year Business Rocks introduced a “Tech for Good” hackathon with a theme: “How can technology solve world homelessness?” Hackers were divided into teams to come up with life changing ideas and solutions to solve the ever-growing problem of homelessness. The winner was team Limbo, who proposed an app that encouraged and helps homeless and vulnerably people to find work opportunities. Well done to the winning team and all the other hackers, who participated

Localz Research: The Use of Location Services, Based on One Million People

April 25, 2016
In a previous blog, we published the results from our online survey, where respondents explained under what circumstances they would enable location services and why they deny the access in the first place. In part two, we are comparing this with real data, which indicates how many people actually use location services in the real world. Part Two – How do people use location services in real life? Hardly any enterprises, agencies or location service providers have published reliable and statistically significant data about the actual use of location services and Bluetooth low energy (BLE) for beacons. We decided to have a look ourselves and took a sample of one million devices [1] with our location management SDK installed. Specifically, we looked at four different apps with our SDK in it as per the table below. Industry (UK only)        Location enabled use case Food delivery app Location triggered offers Luxury car brand app VIP check-ins at onsite arrival Retailer app Click & Collect remote check-in Public event app Reminder to use the app on site Overall sample size: one million unique device IDs (app installs) For the purpose of this paper, we analysed the operating system and the app settings, with a specific focus on location services and Bluetooth activation. Why did we take a sample size of a million? Well, apart from it being a nice round number, we wanted the sample to be statistically significant. And it is also pretty much the upper limit of what my late 2013 MacBook Pro can cope with using Excel without crashing… Here is what we found. Location services enabled for the device Let’s start with the generic stuff. From the one million devices in our sample, 76.6% were running IOS and 23.4% Android. This ratio is reflective of what we see in our total population of SDK installs [2]. From the total number of devices, 90.1% had location services enabled at the device level. This is Step 2 of the funnel and means that almost ten percent of all devices in our sample either did not have any location capabilities, or location services had been manually disabled by the user. When we look at IOS and Android numbers individually, we see a fairly large difference: IOS – 96.2% of devices have location services enabled Android – 70.1% of devices have location services enabled. In other words, IOS users seem to be more inclined to enable location services at the device level than Android users.  We believe the reason behind this is the (historically) different way that Android apps ask for permissions – all app permissions are requested as part of one install screen that only provides an ‘Install’ or ‘Cancel’ button. On IOS, access to location services is requested specifically as part of the install and therefore a lot easier to deny for an app. This leaves Android users that want to use an app, but do not want to give it access to location services, no other option than to switch off

Guest blog from Future Platforms: Why In-Store Mobile is Massive for Retailers and their Customers

April 20, 2016
In 2015, for the first time ever, smartphones overtook laptops as the UK’s most widely-used internet-enabled devices with two thirds of households now containing at least one. The dominant platform of choice for users, and technologically capable of meeting the industry’s biggest challenges, mobile is the perfect medium for retailers to boost sales and deliver better in-store customer experiences. SessionM research shows that 90% of American shoppers will use their devices while in-store, but with 44% of the world’s leading retailers still not offering an iPhone app, there remains an enormous opportunity for stores to take better advantage of mobile. An experience built around consumers’ needs We benefit from an online shopping experience built around our needs and preferences, thanks to saved baskets, customer accounts, and suggestions based on our browsing and purchase history. Walk into a physical store, however, and more often than not we’re unrecognised by store assistants and have no way of bringing the information that retailers already have about us into our “offline” experience. With the introduction of a mobile app and the smart implementation of beacon technology, customers could benefit from a more intelligent and contextual in-store shopping experience. The app would serve as the bridge to all of a customer’s information, such as favourite items and purchasing history, while beacons would represent a way to make that information relevant by delivering services at the optimal time within the store. Using app and beacon technology, a retailer knowing Mrs Jones regularly purchases hats (in-store and online) could send her a personalised notification when she arrives, saying that new headwear lines arrived last week. It’s marketing that’s relevant, timely, and more likely to result in a purchase. In fact, Deloitte research showed that in-store conversion rates are up to 21% higher for those using a retailer’s dedicated app. And, even at the level below tailored push notifications, mobile’s still a great way to augment the in-store browsing experience. Scannable barcodes or beacons next to certain products could give customers one-tap access to product reviews and additional information, adding greater value to the in-store visit. Increasing in-store efficiency Alongside their customers, retailers can themselves gain a great deal from implementing mobile into their in-store strategy. Knowing more about shoppers’ interests and purchasing patterns helps develop smarter marketing suggestions, with valuable insight into how customers break down by gender, age, average purchase value, and more. Those beacons that allow Mrs Jones to be made aware of new hats would also help retailers better understand their store operations. When placed around an entire location, the technology can generate heat maps that indicate popular areas of the store and show how customers travel around it. Combined with the data that customers willingly provide about their purchasing history by virtue of having an account, stores are given a powerful tool to help deliver campaigns, promotions, and merchandising layouts that customers are more receptive to and as a result generate higher conversion rates. Store staff could additionally be equipped with custom mobile

Localz Survey Results: 80% of Smartphone Users Enable Location Services

April 19, 2016
Introduction Our most frequently asked question: “How many people have Location Services and Bluetooth activated on their smartphone? “ Somewhere mid-2014, I happened to sit next to the Head of Digital of one of Britain’s leading retailers at a seminar. He told me that he wasn’t a fan of apps. And even less about location services. It was almost certainly more effective and cheaper to just put some posters up in the windows he told me. It was him who mentioned the ‘funnel’ to me for the first time. By funnel, he meant the number of conditions that need to be met before you can engage with a customer via their smartphones, based on where they are in the real world. This funnel goes something like this – and at each step a percentage of your target audience will drop off: The (prospective) customer needs to have a smartphone Location services need to be enabled for the device An app needs to be installed [1] Ideally, the customer has to be signed into the app, so you can make the experience more personalised and relevant The app itself needs to be authorised to use location services If beacons are used in addition to GPS, the customer is required to have Bluetooth (low energy) enabled. The great thing about this approach is that it requires a full opt-in from users. The drawback is that it could leave you with less of an audience than you may think. And to make matters worse, if the experience you are giving to them when they do walk into a physical location is not great – for instance by spamming them with ads – you may lose them forever. It’s only two taps to remove an app after all (and it requires four taps to switch off location services). It is hard to find reliable information about how many people generally get through the funnel and have authorised location services and Bluetooth on, or are prepared to do this. As we get these questions from our customers all the time, we decided to do some research into this ourselves based on our current users. Our research has been split into two parts: Firstly, we asked over 500 people about their use of location services in Part 1; and Secondly, we analysed the smartphone settings of one million smartphone users of our customers that have our SDK in their app in Part 2. Since the results were so interesting, we decided to publish them, and add a third part –  what’s next – in which we cover various manners to get around the funnel that worked for us. Part One- What do people say when asked about using location services? The first thing we did, was actually go out and ask 554 random smartphone owners across the United States, United Kingdom and Australia about their use of location services. From these respondents, 54% have an IOS device and 46% own an Android device. The results differ slightly per geography. For
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Blurring the lines between online and offline

May 23, 2016
One thing that is clear about the modern shoppers is that they don’t shop online or offline – they just shop. If a customer is browsing online, and provided a great personalised online experience, they expect that to translate into their in-store experience. The challenge for brands and retailers is to provide one seamless experience, from online to the physical store. For example, when customers start their journey online with Click and Collect, by placing an order online, often retailers have done a good job of making this online experience smooth and frictionless. But when a customer arrives in store – they don’t know where to go to collect their parcel, and when they do, they may have to queue for a long time, giving the customer a poor experience that they do not wish to repeat. So how can we bridge this gap between the digital and the physical experience? Well, the great thing, is that 66% of UK adults [1] are walking around with a smartphone in their pocket, and some even with a smart watch on their wrist. We are all constantly connected online, as we walk around the physical world. Not only that, according to a recent study Localz conducted, across over 1M smartphone users, including both our own user base, and surveying others – 80% of smartphone users have location services switched on. So what does that mean? It means that you can communicate with 80% of your app users, in real-time, as they walk into your store. Location technology can let you know, in real-time where a customer is in the physical world.  Not only that – you can communicate with them in real-time. Think of all the possibilities that opens up. People often think of beacons when they think of location technology, but actually a geo-fence, which is an area defined by GPS coordinates, can sometimes be just as effective. A geo-fence does not need hardware and takes minutes to setup. Using this technology is an easy way to connect your customers’ online experience with their in-store experience.  So what is the best way to use this great technology? If you think customers get annoyed if they feel like they are being spammed via email, imagine how they will react if they feel like you are spamming them on their mobile phone. Flooding customers with annoying irrelevant offers is not the answer. If a customer has had a great personalised experience online, this needs to translate into their in-store experience. The best use of location technology is when it is used to remove friction from an experience, by providing better customer service. For instance, Woolworths Australia is using geo-fences across over 200 stores, to improve the retailer’s Click and Collect experience. The initial results from using location technology include dropping average collection times from 15 mins to 7 mins, with the fastest collection being just under a minute – and this continues to improve. To read the full use case, click here. The great thing

5 Ways Location Technology Can Improve Banking Service

May 20, 2016
The banking industry is one of the many industries affected by digital disruption. Banks are looking to meet customer demands with innovative technologies and offer them convenience and efficiency. With technology changing the way customers interact with their world, banking customers are also seeking better, more convenient and faster service. According to a report by Fujitsu UK&I [1], 72% of UK customers use online banking on a weekly basis. Furthermore, in a Juniper Research [2] report, it is stated that 71% of UK customers use mobile banking. Both numbers show how important it is for banks to have an online presence and more specifically, a mobile one. However, it is not enough to only create a mobile app or a mobile-friendly website to keep up with customers’ demands. Banks need to go the extra mile and deliver an exceptional, personalised experience to their customers. With 39% of UK customers considering leaving their provider if digital demands are not met, banks need to consider new technologies to improve their service. Location technology is one of these technologies. Here are five ways in which location technology can improve payment and banking experiences. VIP Greeting and Service Banks can use beacon technology to integrate the physical branch of a bank with a mobile device in the hands of a customer. When customers enter a branch, the staff can be alerted and can greet customers in person, by name. Staff can be updated with a customer’s personal details on a dashboard or mobile device, allowing them to provide a personalised service based on the customer profile. Dynamic Scheduling Dynamic scheduling would allow for staff to provide flexible scheduling options to customers, by enabling them to book and updated appointments in real-time. For example, when a customer is close to a bank branch, they could check to see whether that particular branch has an available advisor at that moment. This would enable them to book an appointment straight away, or the bank could provide the customer an alternative time or branch, saving time and avoiding queues. Frictionless Checkout Location technology can be used to streamline the payment process, whether payment is online from home, in branches or through third party websites (such as paying for an Amazon order). There is nothing more frustrating for customers than being asked to enter personal details multiple times for the same payment transaction. For example, when customers order online through a retailer and are prompt to enter passwords and are redirected to the bank website for security checks. To eliminate this long process of identifying whether the person who is doing the transaction is the owner of that bank account/credit card, banks can use location technology. By knowing the person’s location, banks could monitor where the mobile device of that person is in real-time and compare it to the address on the system. If the person’s device is at the home or work address, the payment process could be shortened, as it confirms the right person is making the payment. People

Localz Co-Hosted Killer Retail Experience: Part Two

May 19, 2016
What makes a killer retail experience? Retailers need to think about delivering a unique experience, which is relevant to the customer and to their brand. In order to do so, retailers should constantly innovate and use the latest technology to build an omni-channel customer journey that fulfills customers’ needs. After the huge success of the Killer Retail Experience in March 2016, the hosts Teradata, Peerius, yReceipts and Localz decided to organise the event again, but make it bigger and better. With inspiring talks, innovative demos and a panel discussion, the latest Killer Retail Experience gathered representatives from top brands like Unilever, Marks & Spencer, JD Williams, Topman, New Look, Russell & Bromley and many more. To kick off the event, Holly Mander, Director of Digital Strategy at Teradata, talked about how brands can keep up with shoppers being digitally connected all the time. Alexander Kayser, CEO and Co-Founder of yReceipts, spoke about unlocking the £37 billion brick and mortar opportunity by linking the online and offline channels. Nimmity Zappert, Head of Sales and Partnerships at Localz, continued the discussion about how retailers can build that bridge using location technology. Nimmity highlighted that 80% of smartphone users have location services enabled, which means that location technology gives retailers the ability to connect with customers as they walk into their store, in real-time. Joey Moore, Product Director at Peerius, explained the benefits of providing personalised experience to customers. Customers who receive personalised marketing increase their spent by 13%. The last presentation was by Andrew Howe, Sales Director at Teradata, speaking about how programmatic advertising enables retailers to future proof their marketing and to fully understand their customers. After all the amazing talks and insights into how to create a great customer experience, attendees were divided into groups to see the Killer Experience demo, combining all the solutions of the four hosts. You can see a video of the experience here. A panel discussion was moderated by Katy Bennett from Teradata and included Victoria Peppiatt, COO at Phrasee; Richard Wilson, Director of Digital at Burton Arcadia; Sophie Albizua, Consultant and Co-Founder of eNova Partnership and Holly Mander from Teradata. The panel discussed the key areas for retailers to focus on, to move closer to a true omni-channel experience. Ideas included: Linking and understanding customer behavior online and in-store is key. 80% of customers browse online before making a purchase in store. Connecting with customers across all channels is essential for retailers’ success. Getting in store and meeting customers face to face, is key to understanding what they want, and to developing a successful digital strategy. 49% of digital jobs have been held for less than a year. Organisations need to be forward thinking and innovative to attract and retain the right talent for digital success. Train from within, to make digital innovation a part of the culture, and accessible to all. Here is a video with the highlights from Killer Retail Experience 2: Retailers learnt that a killer experience puts customers needs at

Localz Last Mile Delivery with DPD UK

May 16, 2016
Localz Last Mile helps DPD UK to improve their last mile delivery service by reducing costs and increasing first time delivery rates. DPD has launched Your DPD, a new mobile app which allows customers to track their deliveries and update their delivery preferences while the parcel is in-flight. The challenge DPD set for Localz was to improve first time delivery rates which would improve the customer experience and reduce DPDs operating costs. Localz Last Mile provides the latest in location technology to enable DPD and their delivery drivers to check whether a customer is at the provided delivery address in real-time before reaching the destination. If a customer is away from home, they can be provided with options to reschedule their delivery or authorise to have it left in a safe place or with a neighbour in real-time. DPD are a leading parcel delivery company in the UK. The company prides itself as a delivery expert that can satisfy all distribution needs. DPD UK works with top retail clients like ASOS, Amazon and John Lewis to provide a delivery experience that matches and exceeds their customers expectations. The YourDPD app lets customers receive push notifications when the driver is 30 minutes away from the delivery address. If the customer is not at home and wants to reschedule the delivery they will receive a push notification, via the Localz Last Mile platform, asking them if they would like to update their delivery preference. For example: “Hi Ben, our driver is on his way to your address and we noticed that you’re not home. Would you like to change your preference to allow someone else to sign/leave parcel in a safe place/leave it with a neighbour or deliver to another address?” The response is then sent to the driver in real time. An additional feature is that, with the customers’ permission, the YourDPD app can automatically detect when the customer has returned to the delivery address, prompting a message to the customer and the driver to return with the delivery later in their run. Here is a short video to demonstrate some of the benefits of Your DPD:   About the project, Tim Andrew, Co-Founder and Commercial Director at Localz says: “ DPD’s clever use of location technology to improve the efficiency of their last mile delivery service and customer experience is going to reinforce their position as the UK’s most innovative logistics company.” Localz Last Mile saves time and money by helping to reduce delivery and SMS costs. It has the additional environmental and cost benefit of materially reducing the number of wasted miles driven. Improved first-time delivery significantly improves customer satisfaction with both DPD and the clients they are delivering on behalf of.

Guest blog from RedEye: 4 Key Steps to Guide your Customer Through an Omni-Channel Journey

May 13, 2016
App…email…in-store…wait, where is my customer going now? Tracking down where your customer is and working out how to keep them engaged with your brand is a challenge faced by all multi-channel retailers, but it is precisely this challenge that also presents a huge opportunity. Let’s look firstly at our online channels- these include website, apps, emails, social channels. With the real-time flexibility that digital channels allow, you can provide a wealth of information, give clear product and service visibility and allow customers to purchase wherever they may be. Then we have our primary offline channel, our bricks and mortar stores – these allow customers direct interaction with products, staff and enable a physical immersion of the brand. Customers may already successfully engage with your brand through one or many of these touch points but the journey customers take across both online and offline channels will be their overarching – and total – experience of that brand. It is at this level where they will accumulate the memories, perceptions and ultimately their loyalty. So how exactly do you keep up with customer’s expectations, gain their trust across all channels and stay ahead of competition all at the same time? I believe the key to success is to ensure that customers who start out online, browsing your website or checking out your app are reinforced with a memorable experience when entering your store. This also works in reverse, your online channels should make your customer feel as valued as they would in your store. Here are my four key steps in which you can ensure you are guiding your customer through an engaging omni-channel customer journey: DO YOUR RESEARCH The first and most important step is to commit to truly understanding your customers’ journey and end-to-end experience with tailored user research, both online and in-store. Direct user experience research will help to unlock the precise insights which tell you exactly when and where you should – or should not – be engaging with your customer and delivering content. Examples of research methods include: In-store observation to identify points of opportunity Survey and interview feedback to gather insights Web and store analysis A GENUINE SINGLE CUSTOMER VIEW So now you have done your research it’s time to evaluate if you have a Single Customer View. The Single Customer View is what enables the delivery of a genuinely memorable and joined up journey for anyone who engages with a brand across online and offline platforms. It has been found that high performing marketers are 10x more likely to be actively mapping their customer journeys and 14x more likely to have integrated systems for a Single Customer View, compared to under-performers. These high performers were also found to be 34x more likely to be excellent at creating personalised omni-channel customer experiences. [2016 State of Marketing Report, Salesforce] Consider just some of the possible data that you could be collecting online that could influence your offline strategy: Categories browsed Products viewed Saved preferences and personal information

Product Update: Beacon Toolkit

May 5, 2016
Localz has updated the Beacon Toolkit with some cool new features and UI enhancements. In the past few weeks, we started to share with you what our developers have been up to. Before we get into that, let’s remind you what the Localz’ Beacon Toolkit is and what is does. Beacon Toolkit is a simple app that allows your compatible iOS device to become a Bluetooth Low Energy (iBeacon compatible) beacon. With this app you can generate beacons from QR codes, URLs, JSON files or manually create beacons yourself. It also makes it much simpler to use any existing compatible iOS hardware as a beacon trigger and removes the need to purchase and manage additional beacons. So, what’s new with Localz Beacon Toolkit app? With our next update, you’ll be able to login to your Spotz platform account to synchronise the beacons you’ve setup. This is particularly useful during testing and implementation as any changes you make in the platform are synced with the app. Included in the updated version is the ability to login to either the Australian (AU) or European (EU) Spotz environments to ensure everyone who uses the Spotz platform can access their user account and beacons in the Beacon Toolkit. There are some new UI enhancements. The developers team has also been working hard at squashing any remaining bugs. What haven’t we changed? The Beacon Toolkit retains the ability to set up and store beacons on the local device without a Spotz account. We have kept the in-built folder structure, because it makes it much easier to find your way through the app. We would love to hear what your thoughts are on the updated Localz Beacon Toolkit. Download the new app here and give your feedback.  

Top 6 Best Practices to Maximise take up of Location Services

May 3, 2016
At first glance, the results of our survey and research make sober reading. Especially for beacon manufacturers. The funnel carves out about 85% of your app users, leaving just over 15% of your app users that you can potentially engage with via BLE. When BLE is not considered, and geofences are used instead, the numbers look much better – just over half of your app users can be engaged via location services, which is more encouraging. But on reflection, when we consider the survey results, respondents indicated that 80% were prepared to switch location services on – provided there is a benefit and their privacy concerns have been addressed. So what can be done about this to improve the uptake and will this work?  Well, in two recent apps that we location enabled for our customers, a lot of focus was put into getting a large uptake of location services – and particular BLE. This was done by implementing the following: Providing a well-designed coaching screen that emphasises the benefits of turning location services and BLE on during app install. Clearly stating what location information is used and when– just before the location permission pop up is triggered by the OS. Providing an app banner at the top of the app when it is in the foreground and location services or BLE are off. For example, Sending a push message to customers in a geofence to remind them to switch BLE on when they go into the venue (need to be careful with this, as this can easily perceived as spam) Marketing and communications near the locations that highlight the benefits of the app, with a focus on saving time or money. This is ideally a combination of physical, online and mobile branding, with enthusiastic staff encouraging the use of the app Last but not least, demonstrating value to customers. This is not serving them an ad for a cross-sell, but more about saving them money and time. This is not an exhaustive list and we are sure there are more ways to achieve this.  However, when we specifically look at an app where steps 1 to 6 were well executed, the results look like much more promising: This shows that some simple tricks can cause a substantial uplift of users that are prepared to use location services and Bluetooth. When compared to the overall average, the number of users that have authorised the app for location services increases from 51.7% to 83.5%. The bigger increase seems to come from users switching their BLE on – from 27.8 to 74%. The likely reason for this is that it is relatively easy to switch on BLE on devices (slide up/down and tap). Overall, it looks like that the effect of the funnel can be beaten, but 100% coverage – or even in the 90s will be unlikely at this stage. There just needs to be a clear benefit for customers and not too much creepiness about what information is collected and

Top 10 Tips for successful Click and Collect service

April 29, 2016
In recent years, click and collect has become very popular to the extent that it is now a vital offering for any large multi-channel retailer. With home deliveries not offering convenient delivery times or affordable prices for a same day or next day deliveries, customers nowadays prefer to order online and collect it in-store later. In 2015, 73% of the UK online shoppers used click and collect [1] and one in five said the service changed the way they shopped [2]. This is evidence of how significant it is for retailers to offer the service and to get it right. So what does a retailer have to consider to ensure the delivery of a great click and collect customer experience? Here are top ten tips on how to succeed: Promote the service It might be obvious, but if you want customers to use click and collect, promote it. If the service is not properly displayed on your website, how are customers supposed to benefit from it? Make it visible on your home page, product pages, basket pages and throughout the whole checkout process. The same applies to your mobile site and app. Take for example John Lewis, who state clearly that they provide click and collect as a service: Advertise click and collect in-store, too. Ensure it works across all devices In times when customers use multiple devices to place orders, retailers need to make sure that they have a stable, consistent presence both online and offline. Barclays [3] predicts UK customers will spend £53.6bn a year using their smartphones and tablets by 2024. This means that retailers have to ensure they have a well-designed, responsive and easy to use desktop site, mobile site and mobile app with a smooth running click and collect service. Allow users to check local stock availability Providing customers with information about stock levels is essential. Customers want to know if you have the items they want to buy in their preferred store. It saves the frustration of going all the way to that store and finding out that the item they viewed online is not available. Additionally, if the stock level of a specific order is low and customers can see that, it can push them towards a purchase. You can also suggest alternative products for the items that are out of stock. There is a chance the customer is buying a gift for somebody else and does not mind buying a similar item instead. Be clear about timings Customers do not want to waste time and wait around in a store. That is one of the main reasons why they prefer click and collect over home delivery. Tell them if the order will be ready later that day or tomorrow after 5 p.m. They have to know when they have to be there to pick it up. Don’t charge for the service Customers always want to pay as little as possible. They will not spend extra money if they can get the same product from your

Localz Attended Business Rocks 2016

April 27, 2016
Last week, Localz travelled to Manchester to attend one of the most exciting events this year Business Rocks 2016. With keynote speakers like Steve Wozniak, Co-Founder of Apple, and Jeff Hoffman, Founder of Priceline.com, the technology and investment summit definitely was the place to be this April. The second we arrived at the venue, Manchester Central Convention Complex, we could feel the excitement and the anticipation of everyone, waiting for the doors to open and Business Rocks to start. KPMG and Tesla Motors UK were the first two big stands that you could not miss. The middle of the venue was occupied by more exhibitors’ stands and in each corner of the hall there was a stage, each serving a different purpose and audience. The Headline Stage hosted world-class keynotes and panel debates from some of the biggest names in the tech world, including Steve Wozniak, Co-Founder of Apple. In the Developer Dome, there were demos and sessions on topics, covering iOS, Android, Enterprise Apps, Fintech, Connected Car, e-commerce, IoT, Payments, Gaming, Wearables, UX & UI design and App monitisation. The Investor Stage included keynote talks, panel sessions, and surgeries about tech investment, investor speed dating and meeting areas. And finally, the Innov8 Battle Stage was where 100 global tech start-ups were competing against each other by pitching in front of 20 world-class tech judges. Even though all the talks were very interesting, two of them were enjoyed by the Localz’ team enormously. Obviously, the first one was the highlight of Business Rocks 2016 – the interview with Steve Wozniak, Co-Founder of Apple. He spoke about the company and his present position in it as well as how, together with Steve Jobs, they created Apple II. During his on-stage interview with Sunday Times journalist Bryan Appleyard, the “Woz” shared his opinion about artificial intelligence and why he believes humans will become ‘the family dogs’ of the robots in the future. No surprise the Headline Stage was overcrowded for that one hour. Another inspiring talk was the one, given by Jeff Hoffman, the Founder of Priceline.com. He spoke about the ideas and businesses he came up with in the past. He also shared some stories from his childhood and linked them to the idea that people easily give up on their dreams and goals, which should not be the case. Jeff explained how dreams are driving people to success and how we need to spend every day trying to get closer to accomplishing our dreams – whether that’s money, travelling around the world or an expensive Ferrari. Apart from the very exciting and educational talks, this year Business Rocks introduced a “Tech for Good” hackathon with a theme: “How can technology solve world homelessness?” Hackers were divided into teams to come up with life changing ideas and solutions to solve the ever-growing problem of homelessness. The winner was team Limbo, who proposed an app that encouraged and helps homeless and vulnerably people to find work opportunities. Well done to the winning team and all the other hackers, who participated

Localz Research: The Use of Location Services, Based on One Million People

April 25, 2016
In a previous blog, we published the results from our online survey, where respondents explained under what circumstances they would enable location services and why they deny the access in the first place. In part two, we are comparing this with real data, which indicates how many people actually use location services in the real world. Part Two – How do people use location services in real life? Hardly any enterprises, agencies or location service providers have published reliable and statistically significant data about the actual use of location services and Bluetooth low energy (BLE) for beacons. We decided to have a look ourselves and took a sample of one million devices [1] with our location management SDK installed. Specifically, we looked at four different apps with our SDK in it as per the table below. Industry (UK only)        Location enabled use case Food delivery app Location triggered offers Luxury car brand app VIP check-ins at onsite arrival Retailer app Click & Collect remote check-in Public event app Reminder to use the app on site Overall sample size: one million unique device IDs (app installs) For the purpose of this paper, we analysed the operating system and the app settings, with a specific focus on location services and Bluetooth activation. Why did we take a sample size of a million? Well, apart from it being a nice round number, we wanted the sample to be statistically significant. And it is also pretty much the upper limit of what my late 2013 MacBook Pro can cope with using Excel without crashing… Here is what we found. Location services enabled for the device Let’s start with the generic stuff. From the one million devices in our sample, 76.6% were running IOS and 23.4% Android. This ratio is reflective of what we see in our total population of SDK installs [2]. From the total number of devices, 90.1% had location services enabled at the device level. This is Step 2 of the funnel and means that almost ten percent of all devices in our sample either did not have any location capabilities, or location services had been manually disabled by the user. When we look at IOS and Android numbers individually, we see a fairly large difference: IOS – 96.2% of devices have location services enabled Android – 70.1% of devices have location services enabled. In other words, IOS users seem to be more inclined to enable location services at the device level than Android users.  We believe the reason behind this is the (historically) different way that Android apps ask for permissions – all app permissions are requested as part of one install screen that only provides an ‘Install’ or ‘Cancel’ button. On IOS, access to location services is requested specifically as part of the install and therefore a lot easier to deny for an app. This leaves Android users that want to use an app, but do not want to give it access to location services, no other option than to switch off

Guest blog from Future Platforms: Why In-Store Mobile is Massive for Retailers and their Customers

April 20, 2016
In 2015, for the first time ever, smartphones overtook laptops as the UK’s most widely-used internet-enabled devices with two thirds of households now containing at least one. The dominant platform of choice for users, and technologically capable of meeting the industry’s biggest challenges, mobile is the perfect medium for retailers to boost sales and deliver better in-store customer experiences. SessionM research shows that 90% of American shoppers will use their devices while in-store, but with 44% of the world’s leading retailers still not offering an iPhone app, there remains an enormous opportunity for stores to take better advantage of mobile. An experience built around consumers’ needs We benefit from an online shopping experience built around our needs and preferences, thanks to saved baskets, customer accounts, and suggestions based on our browsing and purchase history. Walk into a physical store, however, and more often than not we’re unrecognised by store assistants and have no way of bringing the information that retailers already have about us into our “offline” experience. With the introduction of a mobile app and the smart implementation of beacon technology, customers could benefit from a more intelligent and contextual in-store shopping experience. The app would serve as the bridge to all of a customer’s information, such as favourite items and purchasing history, while beacons would represent a way to make that information relevant by delivering services at the optimal time within the store. Using app and beacon technology, a retailer knowing Mrs Jones regularly purchases hats (in-store and online) could send her a personalised notification when she arrives, saying that new headwear lines arrived last week. It’s marketing that’s relevant, timely, and more likely to result in a purchase. In fact, Deloitte research showed that in-store conversion rates are up to 21% higher for those using a retailer’s dedicated app. And, even at the level below tailored push notifications, mobile’s still a great way to augment the in-store browsing experience. Scannable barcodes or beacons next to certain products could give customers one-tap access to product reviews and additional information, adding greater value to the in-store visit. Increasing in-store efficiency Alongside their customers, retailers can themselves gain a great deal from implementing mobile into their in-store strategy. Knowing more about shoppers’ interests and purchasing patterns helps develop smarter marketing suggestions, with valuable insight into how customers break down by gender, age, average purchase value, and more. Those beacons that allow Mrs Jones to be made aware of new hats would also help retailers better understand their store operations. When placed around an entire location, the technology can generate heat maps that indicate popular areas of the store and show how customers travel around it. Combined with the data that customers willingly provide about their purchasing history by virtue of having an account, stores are given a powerful tool to help deliver campaigns, promotions, and merchandising layouts that customers are more receptive to and as a result generate higher conversion rates. Store staff could additionally be equipped with custom mobile

Localz Survey Results: 80% of Smartphone Users Enable Location Services

April 19, 2016
Introduction Our most frequently asked question: “How many people have Location Services and Bluetooth activated on their smartphone? “ Somewhere mid-2014, I happened to sit next to the Head of Digital of one of Britain’s leading retailers at a seminar. He told me that he wasn’t a fan of apps. And even less about location services. It was almost certainly more effective and cheaper to just put some posters up in the windows he told me. It was him who mentioned the ‘funnel’ to me for the first time. By funnel, he meant the number of conditions that need to be met before you can engage with a customer via their smartphones, based on where they are in the real world. This funnel goes something like this – and at each step a percentage of your target audience will drop off: The (prospective) customer needs to have a smartphone Location services need to be enabled for the device An app needs to be installed [1] Ideally, the customer has to be signed into the app, so you can make the experience more personalised and relevant The app itself needs to be authorised to use location services If beacons are used in addition to GPS, the customer is required to have Bluetooth (low energy) enabled. The great thing about this approach is that it requires a full opt-in from users. The drawback is that it could leave you with less of an audience than you may think. And to make matters worse, if the experience you are giving to them when they do walk into a physical location is not great – for instance by spamming them with ads – you may lose them forever. It’s only two taps to remove an app after all (and it requires four taps to switch off location services). It is hard to find reliable information about how many people generally get through the funnel and have authorised location services and Bluetooth on, or are prepared to do this. As we get these questions from our customers all the time, we decided to do some research into this ourselves based on our current users. Our research has been split into two parts: Firstly, we asked over 500 people about their use of location services in Part 1; and Secondly, we analysed the smartphone settings of one million smartphone users of our customers that have our SDK in their app in Part 2. Since the results were so interesting, we decided to publish them, and add a third part –  what’s next – in which we cover various manners to get around the funnel that worked for us. Part One- What do people say when asked about using location services? The first thing we did, was actually go out and ask 554 random smartphone owners across the United States, United Kingdom and Australia about their use of location services. From these respondents, 54% have an IOS device and 46% own an Android device. The results differ slightly per geography. For
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